Prescription Check App by Warby Parker: Extend Your Eye Prescription For Free

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Warby Parker sells prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses, primarily online at prices lower than traditional retail optical stores (starts at $95). They can send you frames to try on at home, or you can upload a picture of yourself and “try on” frames virtually.

The next step is to remove the optometrist visit whenever possible. Per this Quartz article, Warby Parker has rolled out a new Prescription Check app that will write you a new prescription (with a new expiration date) if their eye exam shows that your prescription hasn’t changed.

You basically do the “Big E” exam while standing the proper distance away and looking at your desktop computer screen, using the smartphone app for interaction. The updated prescription is written by a licensed eye doctor and is valid at any optical center (not just Warby Parker). The app is registered with the FDA. For now, the service is at the convenient price of free.

The catch? For now, eligibility is limited to the following:

  • Must be a resident of California, Florida, New York, or Virginia.
  • Between ages 18 and 40.
  • Must already own Warby Parker prescription eyeglasses.

Warby Parker says they will increase eligibility over time (and eventually start charging a fee). I went ahead and signed up for e-mail alerts.

I’ve worn glasses for decades and would agree that there are times that I just want another pair of glasses but my eye prescription expired after 12 months. On the other hand, I do feel reassured when I visit the optometrist that everything is alright. Maybe they should extend prescriptions to 2 years if your vision has been stable for a while.

(Added: A reader tweeted that in some states like California, eyeglass prescriptions last for 2 years while contact lenses are for 1 year. Another site that does online eye exams is Opternative.com.)

“My Money Blog has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of selected credit card products. My Money Blog and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. All opinions expressed are the author’s alone, and the content has not been provided nor approved by any of the companies mentioned. MyMoneyBlog.com is also a member of the Amazon Associate Program, and if you click through to Amazon and make a purchase, I may earn a small commission. Thank you for supporting this independent site.”



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Comments

  1. Cindy Chu says:
    • The concerns by optometrists and their professional associations are understandable. I have my own doubts about letting the generic public perform their own eye tests. My perspective is more… if California allows eyeglass prescriptions to last 2 years while other states only have them last 1 year, why is that? There should be data to back up whether 2 years (or 1 or 3) is okay or not. It’s shouldn’t be a lobbying or political issue.

      I can understand more frequent visits for contact lens wearers since it actually lives on your eye (some people have really bad lens hygiene, sleep with them in when it isn’t indicated, etc).

    • Thanks for sharing this link to give two sides to the story.

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