Walmart Savings Catcher: Automated Low Price Guarantee Now Nationwide

(Update: Walmart’s new automated low price guarantee appears to be nationwide now. While still in “beta”, their FAQ has been scrubbed of any geographical limitations. Their inclusions list was changed to add the phrase “most fruits and vegetables.” You must submit receipts within 7 days. Via nicemann of FW. More details below.)

wmcatcherMany stores offer a “low price guarantee” but in reality nobody actually uses them. You have to find the competing price yourself, wait in the returns line, all for the opportunity to argue with the cashier about the validity of your claim. Who wants to do that?

Walmart is has a new feature called Savings Catcher that automates their low price guarantee. Thanks to reader Doug for the tip. Here’s how it works:

  1. Enter the TC Number from your Walmart receipt at walmart.com/savingscatcher or scan the barcode using the Walmart smartphone app.
  2. Savings Catcher compares the prices of the items you bought at Walmart to the advertised prices at the time of your purchase from the print and online versions of weekly print ads of top retailers in your area.
  3. If Savings Catcher finds an advertised price that is lower than what you paid for the same exact item at Walmart, you can get a Walmart Rewards eGift Card for the difference.

This program appears to be available nationwide now. Just for reference purposes, here were the initial test markets and the local competitors they checked against:

  • Atlanta, GA– Aldi, Food Depot, CVS, Food Lion, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, Ingles, Kroger, Publix, Rite-Aid, Kmart, Target, Walgreens, IGA, Wayfield Foods and Piggly Wiggly.
  • Charlotte, NC– Aldi, Bi-Lo, CVS, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, Food Lion, Harris Teeter, Ingles, Kmart, Lowes (Food), Target, Rite-Aid, Publix, and Walgreens.
  • Dallas, TX– Albertsons, Aldi, Brookshires, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, HEB, Kroger, Target and Tom Thumb.
  • Huntsville, AL Market– Aldi, Belle/Food World, CVS, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, Save-A-Lot, Foodland, Kroger, Piggly Wiggly, Publix, Rite Aid, Target, Walgreens.
  • Lexington, KY– Aldi, CVS, Dollar General, Dollar Tree, Family Dollar, Save-A-Lot, Kroger, Meijer, Rite Aid, Target and Walgreens.
  • Minneapolis, MN– Aldi, Cub Foods, CVS, Family Dollar, Hy Vee, IGA, Rainbow Foods, Shopko, Target and Walgreens.
  • San Diego– Albertsons, CVS, Dollar Tree, Ralph’s, Rite Aid, Vons, Smart & Final, Target, Fresh & Easy, Walgreens, Stater Bros and Save-A-Lot.

Savings Catcher applies to your in-store Walmart purchases only. Online prices from competitors don’t count. If you use a manufacturer’s coupon, it will consider the pre-coupon price. You can submit up to 7 receipts per week and 15 receipts per month. Savings are issued on a Walmart gift card that can be used in-store or online. There are item restrictions.

Included:

  • Most groceries such as cereal, rice and most fruits and vegetables except for: store brand items, deli, bakery and weighed items like meat.
  • Consumable items such as paper towels, bleach and trash bags.
  • Health and beauty items such as shampoo and makeup.
  • Select general merchandise items.

NOT included:

  • Store brands, deli, bakery and weighed items like meat.
  • General merchandise items, (including, but not limited to, electronics, media and gaming, toys, sporting goods, housewares, small appliances, home décor, bedding, books and magazines, apparel and shoes, jewelry, furniture, office supplies and seasonal products).
  • Non-branded items.
  • Tobacco, firearms, gasoline, tires, prescription drugs, optical and photo products and services, or products that require a service agreement such as wireless, automotive or financial products.

How much should you expect back? One frequent shopper reports 2-3% back, via DailyFinance:

Anne Jurchak was part of Walmart’s focus group. She said she’s been getting back $5 to $7 on her weekly trips to Walmart in which she typically spends $200 to $250. Jurchak has used those savings to buy holiday stocking stuffers and a case for her e-reader.

Keep in mind that like many other savings programs like CVS ExtraCare and Safeway Club cards, this will collect data on you and basically track your spending to your SavingsCatcher account. I personally don’t worry about that kind of stuff too much, but FYI.

Comments

  1. Price matching is a way for big companies to engage in price fixing tactics which leaves consumers stuck paying monopolistic prices.

    What sense is there for any store to lower their prices if they know their competition will match it.

    If you see a store advertising a lower price, support that store!

  2. umm yeah…this sucks actually. I have been fighting with them for over 2 weeks on something. Six emails later and it’s still not resolved. Aldi had Strawberries and Pineapples on sale and they didn’t match the price. I couldn’t report the error from my phone so had to go to a PC. First they told me that it was because they don’t match farm fresh produce and to refer to their FAQ. So I did that and that policy was nowhere to be found. The only thing even close says it does not match WEIGHED items. Well I can see that with bananas but pineapple and strawberries are sold by the item, not weight. So they emailed me back and said they were working on “correcting” the confusion on their website and then told me that I submitted my receipt 10 days after the purchase which is not true. I bought it on 5/7, reported it on a few days later and their first email back to me was on 5/12 which is only FIVE days, not 10. I am sooo frustrated because it’s almost $5. I should have just gone to Aldi and saved myself the headache. Thank god they are expanding in my area and we will have one right across the street. I am over Wal-mart’s abysmal Customer Service.

  3. Kristin says:

    It worked fine for me. I’m not much of a coupon user so it’s a no hassle option for me and my schedule. Also, even though I like stores like Trader Joe’s etc. Wal-Mart carries the name brands that are a staple in most homes. As for the above reader Kevin – I think this actually creates a perfect competition in economic terms. If Wal-Mart is successful at the trial run, prices hypothetically could be driven lower to near costs where suppliers will eventually have to let retailers know that they can’t cut prices anymore. Costco is a great example of this strategy. Although Costco makes most of it’s margin on membership costs. And bulk. Thank you,

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